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. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell says there's still time for an agreement. >> republicans aren't likely to sign a blank check just because we fin
's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and the s&p 500 being called down by a bybit, as well. we saw markets coming off on friday stateside. pretty significant drops, as well, given that we now seem to be a clashing of heads between the republicans and the demo
. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book in a little increase again, but important is here, not only the expectation part of the index but also that we ge
secretary general could get heated. >>> italy likely to see a strong uptai uptake thanks to supply reductions before year end. >>> and let's twist again. the fed set to announce a fresh around of bond purchases to match the outgoing twist program at the end of the year. >>> the international community blasts north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is saying. >> they're saying saudi arabia figures saying we produce less. now the i.a. saying they produc
worked in italy-- nicholas poussin and claude lorraine. turner followed claude's example by ennobling landscapes with historical or mythological figures. he made frequent visits to wales. as he moved further into the mountains, he found subjects that were central to one of the most powerful elements in late 18th century british aesthetic thought-- the sublime. ♪ the idea of the sublime, embodied by the overpowering majesty of nature's grandeur, was an idea popularized by the philosopher edmund burke. for burke, contemplating that grandeur-- either directly or in paintings-- overwhelmed viewers with feelings of fear, awe and exaltation. it also had a moral element, emphasizing man's insignificance and humility in the face of the terrifying forces of nature. the fascination with the sublime was an international phenomenon that intrigued many artists of the time-- inspiring philippe jacques de loutherbourg's terrifying alpine avalanche... joseph wright's spectacular vesuvius... and caspar david friedrich's transcendent image of a wanderer contemplating the infinite. turner's interest i
're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movement there. the aussie lsh dollar is weaker. the aussie/dollar has been weakening. maybe the researchers of the yen not doing too much to spur sentiment. in any case, let's get the latest out of singapore. >> good morning. you're right, sill st some danger for the japanese markets. however, the yen-sensitive shinzo abe trade still in place. we did see the nikkei gain another 5% today. over the last 15 weeks, it has gained 15%. analysts saying it's now in overbought territory. the nikkei 225 keeps gaining. dollar/yen, pretty flat today. although we were sitting on that 84 handle a little bit earlier. all eyes now on the central bank meeting later this week. expectations for some aggressive monetary easing for al
that means but italy has its own laws as you know, probably as well as anybody. but he wants -- he'd like to continue to run the show because he feels just like mario draghi that he's been very successful and he can't let go of the reins. now i understand that. but he doesn't want to run. >> he's been very successful and he tells us about that. >> right. >> he had his july 26th surprise between him and mario draghi but in the end as you pointed out off camera he doesn't want to lose. he's not going through the process in a way where he can lose. basically if you appoint me i'll take it. >> right. >> i think president obama or any politician in the u.s. would love to have those terms up. >> right. he wants the terms. no election. i don't want that process. i don't want the feeling of rejection but i'd like to continue in this path. italy has to make a decision and i think the big money will line up behind him. we see the reactions when berlusconi was on the rise for those two days the bond market got trashed again in italy and he's been out there talking this morning anyway. >> switching g
through this organization in europe, it's much easier to come to a coordination between italy, france and spain that if we had little representative. so europe with this model of collection societies is making it much easier to implement in other countries. >> and what do you expect this to mean for the music industry as you look ahead as you've cleared this obstacle? >> our aim is to make sure that the digital music market is developing. take the work of people talking to the consumer and what we want is to make our content more available so that they can stimulate more the market and give some interesting value to the consume are. so our aim is to make the digital market growing even faster. >> and what model did you have in mind if any or did you have to create the model here? >> well, you know, we are here to make sure that all digital platform -- we are here to support them. so whatever the models they ca imagine, we're here to find a way to find the connection between our consumer and creators. we're here to facilitate and make sure at the end the music market is growing again.
to the german chancellor more. >> president francois hollande, together with italy and spain, pushed back against germany's strict austerity plans for europe. the amended year, there was a sense that germany might cut in its place, the southern european countries were going to build up a counterbalance, but that has not really been borne out. especially since hollande never followed through with his drive to renegotiate the fiscal pact. that did not happen. >> for germany, that meant sticking to the status quo. chancellor merkel met with the greek prime minister in october. she made it clear that austerity remains the number one priority, but her message is not popular with the greek people. >>>> i know that these reforms demand a lot from people in those countries that are especially hard hit by the crisis, but the efforts are not for nothing. they are worth it. the reforms are working. >> one has to admit that chancellor merkel is very successful in pushing through her own agenda, weather you like it or not. she makes compromises, but at the end of the day, germany's positions are visib
%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in boston that couldn't aafford to get their children he anything. this year for almost six decades help kamt no
roughly speaking in the likes of italy and france and actually grew for germany. then in q4, it seems that there is a greater degree of destocking i think, materializing. i think that is going to lead to some weakness on the industrial production side and it does appear that the austerity is very much perceived by household and by service sector companies. and that explains this relatively soft data. it's a sign that really we are still in a period of multi-year major fiscal entrenchment and at the same time, we have a very cautious perspective towards taking on debt. both by the suppliers and the demanders of that debt. >> julian, very briefly, will we see more qe? will we see any more next year or not? >> well, it will depend, i think, on how things develop. on our baseline forecast, the answer to that would be no because we are looking for recovery coming through really reasonably significantly from the first quarter of next year with .4% quarter on quarter. >> julian, thanks for that. always good to see you. julian kelly joining us from barclays. which country is more corrupt and
lost an arm during a battle in italy. he became the first japanese-american in congress and served 50 years in the senate. he played a key role on two major congressional investigators, watergate and iran contra. daniel inouye died yesterday. he was 88 years old. >>> it looks like the first president bush will get to spend christmas at home with his family. the 88-year-old former president could be released from a hospital any day now. he's been in the hospital since the day after thanksgiving. doctors have been treating him for bronchitis. >>> two kansas police officers gunned down while on the job were remembered last night in topeka. they were both shot in the head while investigating a suspicious vehicle in a grocery store parking lot. the shooter, a man with a history of theft and weapons convictions, was later killed in a shootout with police. >>> a huge drug bust in colombia where authorities seized literally a ton and a half of cocaine. the shipment was set to go to honduras, then mexico, where it would have been delivered to a drug trafficking cartel. the drugs have an estima
in italy that have been pressed into action. at this one north of venice, they're building this huge steel platform. it's one of six platforms that'll be lowered into the water, its legs anchored into the hard granite sea floor. when the ship is rolled upright, it will roll onto them. so the ship is over there? and what, it's going to roll... >> girotto: yeah, it's going to rotate and rotate slowly to rest on this platform, exactly the same area where we are standing. >> stahl: the platforms are necessary to keep the 60,000-ton ship from sliding off its mountain peaks, down into the abyss. but getting the platforms to the wreck site is an operation in and of itself. >> girotto: and we make the tour of italy. >> stahl: they will be floated by barge from the shipyard to the shipwreck off giglio island. around the heel, around the toe and up to giglio. >> girotto: up to giglio. it is a long trip. >> stahl: how long? >> girotto: it's going to take... it's going to take 15 days. i tell you, it is a gigantic project. if you simply think of the quantity of steel, is three times the weight of th
." i'm greg gutfeld or as i am known in italy, the florence flasher. now to andy levy for a regame report. w45* is coming up on tonight's show? >> our top story tonight is the gop too extreme? well i have never seen any of them chug mountain dew and then go snowboarding, so probably not. in the wake of the senseless tragedy they want a study on how violent video games affect children. stupid extreme republicans. oh wait. and then what happens when we send bill schulz out to ask people what they think about the nhl lockout. hopefully they body check him to the ground and then drop to the ground and he passes out because of the pain and then pummel him again and then he passes out because of the pain and then repeat the process at 37 times. >> what are you doing here? jay what do you mean? >> technically this show isn't happening. >> why is that? jay because the world has ended. >> greg, it is entirely possible . the mayans are on central time so the world might not have ended. we may get it in under the wire. >> or it could be a strange illusion that when the world ends there is a m
in italy. he became the first japanese-american in congress. and served 50 years in the u.s. senate. daniel inouye died yesterday at a washington area hospital of breathing problems. he was 88 years old. >>> and secretary of state hillary clinton is said to be feeling a little more like herself after suffering a concussion last week. two teams of doctors checked her out. even putting her on an i.v. drip for a short time. aides say she is frustrated and wants to return to work. she will be unable to testify at the congressional hearings on benghazi this week. but she may do so down the road. >>> and the pacific northwest is recovering from the strongest storm of the season, complete with blinding snow, drenching rain and damaging winds. 80-mile-per-hour winds toppled a huge tree that crashed into a home in western washington, narrowly missing a baby in his crib. fortunately, that child was uninjured. and that storm buried cities, like yakima, under five inches of snow. higher elevations got up to two feet. and thousands of folks lost power. now, they do get a slight break in the weather toda
of headwind from overseas, political shakeup in italy and sharply slowing down chinese export growth, keeping u.s. traders on edge not to mention the vagaries of the fiscal cliff. markets move with progress or lack of progress as the case may be. the congressional budget office says we could be back in recession the first half of next year if a deal is not reached. those are things they're watching. >> mandy drury at the new york stock exchange, thanks. >>> someone sign this kid up. this is christian balkner, giving the tampa bay buccaneers cheerleaders a run for their money. check him out. ♪ >> he is good. they call christian little steer, named after the mascot captain steer. in case you're wondering, yes, he can definitely teach you how to dougie. he is good. >> who are you talking about? oh, there was a little boy there also? >> nice, matt. >> when you said check this out, these guys -- >> in about eight years, that kid will be not be -- >> turning around a lot. >> al roker has your forecast. al? >> thank you so much. we've been talking about this system. first of all, it dumped a ton o
. europe's economic problems are straining ancient fault lines. northern italy recent having ineffective bailout of neighbors. there's an irony. if you apply that across the continent, the eurozone itself would fall apart, perhaps starting with the departure of germany. by the way, if we applied that logic in america, states like new york, california, connecticut could point out they in effect subsidize states like alabama, mississippi, montana, states ironically the most fervent advocates of state rights and small government. >>> up next, we'll take you into the heart of darkness, one of africa's most troubled nations has taken a turn for the worse. back in a moment. who do you think i am, quicken loans? at quicken loans, we'll provide you with myql mobile. this amazingly useful app allows you to take pictures of your mortgage documents using an iphone or android smart phone... so you can easily send them to us. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ooh, la-la! one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident...
inouye lost his right arm in italy and received the medal of honor for his service. daniel inouye died on monday at walter reed military medical center. he was 88 years old. and i want you to watch these pictures. >>> i have some news just into cnn about the attorney general eric holder. we are finding out now the attorney general is set to head to newtown, connecticut, today after meeting with vice president joe biden at 1:00. but don't expect to see him. this is not a public event. the attorney general has scheduled to apparently meet with some of the law enforcement officials in that town and then also with some of the first responders who were the first people to enter the sandy hook elementary school and discover the carnage there that ended up being the loss of 20 children and six adults in that school and then, of course, the mother of the killer who was shot in her bed and the killer himself. the attorney general apparently is not traveling with any other senior justice officials to newtown. he will also not be attending any of the funerals or the memorials. and again, you will
war was the first to see the future. the fascist rose to power in italy, then germany, then a samara totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churned out a liberty ship in a record four and a half days. that's faster than most of my students can wr
back as we're talking, rallied back quite a bit in the ten-year bond futures in italy but you know what, politics aside, mario draghi bought himself and europe some time. i don't know what they'll do with it, it will be 2013's story. >> you nailed it, to me every strategy since the crisis hit in this country in my opinion you could call it kick the can but it's about we have no idea what the effects are going to be, what the exit will be or if any of this is going to work but trying to buy time for something to happen. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >>
with the famous 442nd regimental combat team in world war ii and was grievously wounded in battle in italy. now, mr. president, the citation, the words for his medal of honor are as follows -- every medal of honor recipient, they write a paragraph or two about why he was given this award -- "on april 21, 1945, inouye was grievously wounded while leading an assault on a heavily defended ridge near san turazo in tuscany, italy. the ridge served as a strong point along the strip of german fortifications known as a gothic line which represent the last and most dogged line of german defense in all of italy. as he led his platoon in a flanking maneuver, three german machine guns opened fire from covered positions just 40 yards away, pinning his men to the ground. inouye stood up to the attack and was shot in the stomach. ignoring his wound, he proceeded to attack and destroy the first machine gun nest with hand grenades and fire from his thompson sub machine gun. after being informed of the severity of his wound by his platoon sergeant, he refused treatment and rallied his men for an attack on the se
in italy. he became the first japanese american in congress and served 50 years in the u.s. senate. his death was announced by harry reid. >> the kindness that he has shown me for me time here in the senate has been something i will cherish always. a man who has lived and breathed the senate. he was that patriot. >> very kind words. president obama also a native of hawaii tweeted aloha yesterday. he died yesterday at 88 years old. >>> there is progress in talks on the fiscal cliff, but major sticking points still remain with just two weeks to go. a top republican says there is disagreement over spending cuts versus new taxes and until that could be worked out, there won't be any talks about the specific details. and wall street closed higher over signs of the talks. the dow jones rose 100 points for its biggest gain of the month. early markets overseas also higher because of capitol hill optimism. and a bounce back in china's economy. >>> a holiday miracle for drivers as plunging gas prices hit their lowest point of the year. aaa reports the price of gas fell more than nine cents a gall
were there. australia, russia, italy, france. england, germany. all over the world. following this story. all the major networks were there. you know, cnn was there, of course. and so this is an international event. and so the churches have a particular role when something like this happens. that is to help people make some kind of sense of it. when it first happened, everyone, including me was in a state of complete shock. i heard, i'm the same as anyone else, a sense of sickening sense of how could this possibly happen. and you try to wrap your mind around it. and comprehend that you can't, it's just impossible. even the ways that we typically try to understand events like this through psychology and they say the man was disturbed and things like that. he certainly was. but in a war, you can understand the cultural and political tensions like this, for a natural disaster this goes way beyond that. even a very sick mentally ill individual, could never just because of that, commit a crime so horrendous. so you're thrown back, on religious concepts, that's the only way to under
wanted to go everywhere. he wanted to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france sunday. his generals were pulling their hair out. eisenhower was. he wanted to be all over the map everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded against the germans, and in short order the french collapsed against belgium. they did it over a week -- at
their verdict? and the answer is this. the latest 10 year bond rate for italy is 4.5%, france 2%, just over in fact, and the british bonds are only 1.8%. it's the markets the count and not the party that caused the problem in the first place. [shouting] >> my honorable friend reminds us that we do get a daily verdict on the credibility of our economic policy from bond investors and we're borrowing money more deeply than anyone has done my job before us. there's a real benefit for taxpayers and members of the public in that. we have saved 33 billion pounds in debt interest that we are forecast to have to pay in 2010, and as i said in my statement that is more than the entire defense budget. >> dennis skinner. >> [inaudible] just like on previous occasions like in 2010, when he made his first statement, when it was stripped bare it was a totally different story. then in 2010 he promised -- [inaudible], and here we are two and a half years later, call the national health service. [inaudible] never changes. now, instead of being -- [inaudible] now as chancellor of the exchequer he wrecks the ec
kent. >> as a japanese american soldier in world war ii, he lost his right arm in italy and received the medal of honor. only 31 people have ever lane in capitol rotunda. the last was gerald ford nearly six years ago. >> as the bin laden movie, his theaters -- >> he is right in the inner circle. >> some senators are livid over a scene about torture. plus, a case so shocking it pushed president obama to make a phone call. inside an army daycare, workers who had no business watching children. and should the government buy back guns to boost the economy. you will hear the case. >>> years ago this month, ex-cop heard screams and rifle shots outside her church. a glass door exploded and someone yelled gene is coming through the door. live from denver, welcome to you. take me back to that day. from what i heard from the story, people start ducking and hiding. what happened next? >> the gunman had shot and killed people outside and that alerted me. i heard the muffled pop, pop noises. it even sound like he had come inside the church when he was not inside yet. the gunshots were so loud. the
is not okay. >> we start this morning with breaking news from italy. a massive cruise ship the costa concordia turned on its side after running aground in january. 32 passengers and crew were killed. the captain says it was an accident, not a crime. but he now faces charges. >> the ship's captain is being investigated for manslaughter and abandoning ship. >> he claims he tripped and fell into a life boat. the sentencing of jerry sandusky. >> carol, jerry sandusky will die in jail. >> a judge sentenced the 68-year-old former penn state assistant football coach to at least 30 years in jail after he was convicted of 45 counts of child sex abuse. despite the mountain of evidence against him, sandusky continues to proclaim his innocence. he's in the process of appealing his sentence. >>> number three, the shooting of unarmed 17-year-old trayvon martin. >> my son left sanford, florida in a body bag while george zimmerman went home to go to sleep in his own bed. >> accused gunman george zimmerman claims self-defense in a case that sparked international outrage and ignited racial tensions. the trial i
that is remarkable about the life of dan inouye. the story of his service on the battlefields of italy, --, is indeed remarkable, the physical courage that he displayed in winning the medal of honor is alone enough to earn the title hero. but rising above his physical courage and the guts that he showed is the moral courage that it took for dan inouye and his fellow japanese americans to even set foot on that battlefield. what is it that spurs some of our countrymen to offer their lives in defense of a country that shuns them? where does that love of country come from? and how can we impart some of it to those who too often take this country for granted? it would be a wonderful tribute to dan inouye to seek out ways to encourage such service by future generations. dan inouye's work did not end when he took office -- off his soldier's union you uniform. in many ways, it was just beginning. forced by the loss of his arm to give up dreams of a medical career, he entered politics. his was one of the most remarkable careers of public service that our country has ever seen. we will miss dan inouye so much
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
in afghanistan, what happened that got you a call from the president when you were stationed in italy? >> my unit battle company, we were in a near ambush and there was 18 of us. everyone was doing everything they could. the majority of the shooting was done by all the people around me, which allowed me the freedom of movement. the taliban were trying to take a prisoner, soldier joshua brennan was shot several times and he was still alive and they were carrying him away. as i ran forward, i eliminated the threat and i grabbed sergeant brenner and brought him back to our line, as everyone else continued to fight. it's difficult for me to sit here alone because there are so many great people that are the reason why i'm here. i didn't look out for myself. they looked out for me. and two great men lost their lives that night. >> gretchen: what was it like for you to know that you had been bestowed this amazing honor that no living person has achieved since the vietnam war? >> it kind of hurt me at first. i read the stories about medal of honor recipients and they're heros, they're men that history bo
defending on when you get deployed. we were stationed in italy to families and seeing their children who weren't born yet are walking and talking. it's the family that really is the glue that holds it together. they are one of their parents and it's not that they don't want to be there, their business takes them elsewhere. >> throws everything off. here is to jen. thank you so much. congratulations on the book. >> thank you so much. >> colonel jack jacobs, thank you as well. >> it's good to be here. it's a must read and we look forward to getting up to west point. >> soon. we'll do it. >> all the best to you. new jersey governor chris christie heads to washington to ask for billions in aid as the economic toel reaches $40 billion in his state. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their
, the latest 10 year bond rate for italy is 4.5% from 2% and the british bonds are only 1.8%. it's the markets account and not the parties that are the problem in the first place. >> put my honorable friend remind us that we do get a daily verdict on the credibility of our economic policy for bond investors borrowing money more cheaply than anyone before us. there's a real benefit for taxpayers and members of the public. we have to say 33 billion pounds in debt interest-free forecast have to pay in 2010. that is more than the entire defense budget. >> when the curators say down on the statement, just like on previous occasions like in 2010, when he made his first state to, it was a totally different story. then in 2010, the promised the deficits and here we are two and half years later and called the national health service. now instead of being a bully that breaks the whole room, now is chancellor the exchequer, it wrecks the economy. >> i'm not sure that warrants a proper reply. [shouting] >> mary mcleod. >> thank you, mr. speaker. 1.2 million jobs created in the private sector. my constitue
-al-x-l-l-q are home made in italy. and range in price from $120 to $285. the on line woman shoe company as much in july and specialize in plus size women's shoes. on monday 50 sample shows were stolen out of the top of the company's rapid as his car near 19th illicit street. >> thieves broke into a van and took cash in luggage from and oakland christian youth group while they were visiting florida. assets of about two dozen teens and young adults stop to eat at a restaurant yesterday afternoon after arriving in fort lauderdale for it weekend. the group had planned to be in the four lot of area 45 days. >> pamela mullins was riding her bike on sacramento street when she was shot. family members say she was a block away from her home. there are no suspects in custody. >> thousands of people are expected at pearl harbor to mark the 71st anniversary of the japanese attack. it killed more than 2000 for the american troops and pulled the u.s. into world war two. a moment of silence is planned for 755 local time today marking the moment the bombing began. the crew of a guided missile destroyer was sta
loans were exactly the same at 4% a year in the u.k., spain, and italy. today the four rates are very different. ours has fallen markedly. rates have come in a great deal. i was -- that was the first pillar. the second is that policy would provide the vehicle for accommodating the stimulus to the economy. fiscal policy would be a head wind in terms of the movement of total demand. monetary policy would be accommodative and more importantly, would accommodate the sharp fall in the sterling exchange rate which had taken place between the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2009. that was a 25% fall in the average effective exchange rates of sterling against other currencies. the biggest since the second world war. and the monetary policy was to make sure that that gain in competitiveness was retained by ensuring that domestically generated inflation would remain stable. these pillars were thought to be consistent with the gradual recovery of the economy. what happened was we did not get a gradual recovery. we saw output being broadly flat over the past 2.5 years. it has been a zigzag patte
this morning with breaking news from italy. >> a massive cruise ship, the costa concordia, turned on its side after running aground in january. 32 passengers and crew were killed, the captain says it was an accident, not a crime, but he now faces charges. the ship's captain is being investigated for manslaughter and abandoning ship. he claims he tripped and fell into a lifeboat. the sentencing of jerry sandusky. >> carol, jerry sandusky will die in jail. >> a judge sentenced the 68-year-old former penn state assistant football coach to at least 30 years in jail after he was convicted of 45 counts of child sex abuse. despite the mountain of evidence against him, sandusky continues to proclaim his innocence. he's in the process of appealing his sentence. number three, the shooting of unarmed 17-year-old trayvon martin. >> my son left stanford, florida, in a body bag while george zimmerman went home to go to sleep in his own bed. >> accused gunman george zimmerman claims self-defense in a case that sparked international outrage and ignited racial tensions. trial is set for june. number two -- >>
on 21 april 1945 content so, italy with a retired example of strength, stamina, courage and determination. for which he received one of the 21 idols of honor awarded to soldiers. dan inouye another veterans return to war, having achieved something monumental, something as we say larger than themselves. and they sensed they had earned the right to take larger roles in their communities. they also came tolerant of these in politics different than their own, a sentiment born at the intolerance they had experienced after pearl harbor, but more keenly felt after the horrors they would just do liberating dachau and they understood the importance of good citizenship, of fair play, hard work, of respect for others and for our flag. i have relatives who like dan inouye served in these units, characteristic of the mall was rarely if ever speaking about what they had done in the war. and from then, my generation learned to find virtue in humility and ability of hard work and the value of family and the confidence that we in america could achieve anything. they taught us to hope and
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
on her face was like, what, i'm in new orleans, he's in italy. are you kidding me? >> we just had fun. ♪ >> high. kick high! ♪ >> new york city! [ applause ] >> the producer at the time said, you know, you play bass. yeah. and somehow they worked it out so i was able to play with captain and toneil. i probably rehearsed that song at home 500 times. ♪ ♪ like you see ♪ >> nobody, not one show, not one person, nobody does halloween the way they do halloween at the "today" show. >> susan boyle! ♪ a dream >> when i get that laughter from the crew like, yes, that was a good one. hopefully the people at home are laughing, as well. ♪ >> you can open your eyes. >> do you have anything that sort of numbs the pain before you do this? >> i can't believe i was that old. and i never had my ears pierced. i was really nervous about doing it on tv. mostly because i was afraid that the person who was doing the piercing was going to get nervous. >> oh! >> did i do it -- >> no -- >> i can't tell you how many times i've said i can't believe they're payneath do this. >> thank you. thank you v
in italy, at vatican city, the pope talked about this as well, paying special honor that in his homily in the masses at the vatican expressing his sadness and regret. when you look at a situation like this, we're trying to find answers and we don't have answers. police are trying to put everything together but there were heroic teachers who acted so bravely to save the lives of their students. so many of them coming their rescue. >> victoria soto probably one of of the best stories to emerge out of the horror there at sand hook. she was 27 years old, a dedicated young teacher, a beautiful young gwhat she appark all of the students and -- these details are still emerging. from what it appears she told her students to go in cubbies or cabinets and went the shooter approached her, she told the shooter her students were gone to the gym or library and paid for it with her life but protected the entire class. >> even people who don't know her heard the story of how her first graders were able to survive so at a vigil, people were talking about her. >> i didn't know her at all, but i'm a mom
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